#206: The Finale

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I’ve already dedicated a post to discussing the nostalgia and cultural impact of Game of Thrones, so today I’ll be talking instead about the finale, how I felt about it, and whether it made up for the season that it was a part of (it didn’t, but oh well).

Fans generally separate the show’s seasons into three categories: the great ones (1-4), the good ones (5-6), and the not so good ones (7-8). There’s a general decline in quality from the beginning to the end, unfortunately, and while I understand that that’s normal for a TV show like this, with so much hype and nostalgia behind it to fall a bit flat near the conclusion and climax, it still disappoints a bit.

As for the finale, I liked a couple of characters’ endings: Arya had a strong character ending, learning from the Hound that revenge isn’t necessary and giving up her quest to kill everyone on her list; Jon had an interesting ending, deciding to do what was right for the realm rather than become king himself, a man who had no lust for power; Sansa had a great ending, becoming Queen of the North after enduring so much trauma through the years and years of the show. It feels good to see the good characters receive happy endings, even while the ending felt a bit forced at points. I know that not all the characters received strong endings, but having Brienne write the story for Jaime in the Kingsguard book felt perfect as a send-off for him, considering the episode before this did him dirty. The decision to have Dany die so early in the episode felt right, so I’m glad they didn’t drag that on more than it needed to be, but also, her story and character arc were both really weird overall. I felt like it was rushed, along with the season as a whole. It could’ve been longer in order to fit all that they wanted to do inside it.

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#182: The Long Night

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Talk about complete and total darkness. Not the type that’s momentarily scary, but totally enveloping and ruining. The kind of darkness that makes you question what’s real and what’s not. Absolute carnage takes place in the darkness. After watching Game of Thrones season 3 episode 8’s “The Long Night,” I feel qualified to talk about this darkness, because the episode was dark in more ways than one. The tone and mood of the episode were similarly dreary and frightening, while the atmosphere, setting, and lighting were terrifyingly dark as well. In some parts, the dead seemed like an unstoppable juggernaut, rampaging over anything that even dared to touch them, such as the Dothraki horde with their flaming swords of doom.

By the time this post reaches my blog, it’ll be long past the release of this episode, but I figured it was worth discussing anyway because I bet this episode stands the test of time for awhile. Some may disagree about the overall quality of the episode, but I think having the battle take place in one, 80-minute spectacle felt like the right thing to do, rather than drag it on for longer than necessary. They had to finish it right there and then, as the dead were already picking up and animating the bodies of those who were fighting against them. It would’ve been a hundred times worse otherwise.

I loved the scenes with the red mist, as Winterfell became overrun by zombies and the dead. It really brought home the aspect of dread. I was completely, totally stressed out for the entire episode, and I know others were too. I can’t imagine how it must have felt to film such a thing, to put it all together into one major episode. The budget must’ve been sky high, to begin with. I’m just happy one of my favorite series is coming together like this.