#363: The Fallout

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This won’t necessarily be about the Fallout game series or about fall as a season; instead, I’ll be discussing the ways in which fallout inside a community can be handled. There’s been major fallout recently after some spoilers came out for a certain game which I won’t name here, as I don’t want to spoil anyone by association.

But here’s the thing. Sometimes endings don’t go how people plan them to go. Sometimes endings don’t end up the way the fans want them, and sometimes that happens regardless of all the clamoring people have done for an appropriate ending to the series.

The way that the original game ended was fantastic. It was cohesive, fit the themes of the story, and overall made sense. Invoking this third arc out of nowhere really tears down on what made the first game click for me. It blows up the foundation of a really compelling and thematically-consistent story just to mess with things for the sake of it. In reality, stories need to be consistent and need to have a flow to them in order for them to make sense. A story that already exists in a perfectly fine context doesn’t need forced content to make it better, if anything it needs more development of existing content and characters who feel left out. That’s what gets me about this whole new game; there are areas that need improvement that are just thrown to the wayside to push new content instead.

A game’s ending also has to be satisfying in some way. It doesn’t necessarily have to be positive, but the player has to feel like it was at the very least all worth the time and investment. An ending has to click, and if it doesn’t, people will feel like they wasted their time on nothing.

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#290: The Rotten Vale

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In Monster Hunter: World, there are about five different biomes you can explore: Wildspire Wastes, Coral Highlands, Elder’s Recess, Ancient Forest, and Rotten Vale. Each biome is home to different monsters, so if you’re interested in farming an Anjanath for its plates, you’d likely find one in the Ancient Forest (although one does pop up in the Wastes in a story mission, but… forget about that.) If you’re fighting a Jyuratodos for Aqua Sacs, you’re going to find one in the river area of the Wastes. Certain monsters have certain zones within these biomes that they frequent, such as the Jyuratodos and the lake/river area, and the Pukei-Pukei and the poisonous forest crossing in Ancient Forest.

I decided to write more specifically about the Rotten Vale because the music for it is currently playing from my computer speakers. It’s like the Takeover post I made, which was inspired by the new battle music for Persona 5 Royale. Music inspires writing more than you might think on this blog.

The Rotten Vale is a steamy, poisonous mess. It’s partly jungle, partly cavernous, partly boneyard and infested wasteland. Odogaron, Girros, Great Girros, Radobaan, and Vaal Hazak make their home here, feeding off of the effluvium vanes and the corpses of dead monsters. The vale is one of my favorite biomes in the game, despite the tendency to get electrocuted or poisoned in some way by the monsters that inhabit it. Everything causes a status effect or heightens an existing effect, such as Vaal Hazak’s effluvium health reduction which requires Nulberries to nullify. It’s a true test of preparedness and coming into things with a clear goal and mindset. If you don’t come prepared into the Rotten Vale, things will go south pretty quickly. It features one of the things I love so much about Monster Hunter; you are a tracker just as much as you are a fighter.

#271: The Aether, Part 2

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Aether is paramount to understanding the Final Fantasy story, though. If I were to introduce you to its boundless lore, I wouldn’t know where to start, partially because I don’t have a lot of familiarity with it and partially because I haven’t been paying a deep amount of attention into the lore thus far. Because it’s all still early game progression to me, I haven’t been reading quest text as diligently as I sometimes do in World of Warcraft. Others I know who rarely, if ever, read quest text have said that the Final Fantasy XIV lore is worth getting into, but I still remain unconvinced for the time being. It’s just so much to take on all at once, so much to understand with no real application benefit.

I do appreciate having a lot of lore, though, and I think a great MMORPG requires it in order to function well, in order to feel like a vast, unexplored world to conquer and adventure through. It’s one of the big appeals of World of Warcraft, to me; but also, I know the general lore of WoW and could definitely explain it to someone if they were interested to hear about it. It’s completely buckwild, but it’s fun and it takes up a vast space in my memory regardless. That’s what I get for playing that game for so many hours and days and years of my life.

But sometimes, when you’re playing multiple games at once, the burden of understanding so many different lores and universes and the laws of their individual universes is a lot. Like, for example, I’m currently playing through Fire Emblem: Three Houses as well, and in that game, there are crests, units, kingdoms, castles, so many things to understand about the world. But I can’t simultaneously keep that in my head while also trying to learn about Final Fantasy’s vast, open world, if that makes sense.