#267: The Strategy, Part 2

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During my last post about Fire Emblem, I mentioned the battle system and how it’s more prevalent in this game than in Persona. You can more easily enter a battle, without having to worry about going through six hours of narrative beforehand (cough, Palaces 4-5, cough).

With all this being said, Fire Emblem: Three Houses (on the Nintendo Switch) is more akin to chess than Persona. You have to think many, many turns ahead in order to save your units while also working within the game’s timer and battle conditions. You have to think ahead when instructing your students, and you need to have a plan in mind for each unit, a path or goal they’re striving for. For example, at some point in the future I want to train Edelgard to wear heavy armor, which I think would be an awesome upgrade for her. In order to get her to that place, though, I need to be careful about how I instruct her during class, what lessons I teach her, and what equipment I give her to train with. You have to think ahead, essentially, in order to do everything in this game, and it never lets up on you. If you don’t have a clear plan in mind, the game will start to challenge you more than it did previously, and you will feel a bit overwhelmed by the battles. Your units will become listless and unmotivated without proper guidance.

But despite these obvious pitfalls if you’re not paying attention, the game does a great job of teaching you how to avoid them. It almost makes it impossible to not advance your units, and no matter how poorly you teach, you’ll still come away with some reward, or experience, or lesson learned from it. The game is pretty forgiving, in spite of everything that makes it seem otherwise. I’d highly recommend it.

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#266: The Strategy, Part 1

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Fire Emblem is a game series known for its intense strategy. When one of your units dies, it dies for good, and to get them back, you have to return to an earlier save file. The recent games in the series have offered optional difficulty settings that do away with this age old tradition, but the challenge remains for players who want a taste of the original games. The feeling stays the same in those situations, and I’m glad they included them.

Not counting the mobile game, Fire Emblem: Three Houses is the first entry in the series that I’ve played, and so far, it’s been enjoyable. I like the thoughtfulness that goes into the combat, and all the small details alongside it, such as the way the music speeds up in intensity when units are fighting each other. I like the characters, although they haven’t pulled me in as much as they did in Persona 5. I hear that they get more complicated as the story goes on, but a certain element of Persona’s characters is tied closely to the setting. As in, the fact that the game takes place in the 21st century makes the characters more interesting to me. You can feel their struggles more closely, considering you’ve experienced them too, and not too long ago.

However, the games are different in many regards, and shouldn’t necessarily be compared and judged just based on how relatable their characters are. That wouldn’t be fair to either game. Fire Emblem is more gameplay-focused, I think, and less time is spent on dialogue and narrative, even though the two are heavily focused on still. Fire Emblem has more consistent gameplay moments, such as the mock battles and the battles at the end of every month. They’re weaved into the story experience moreso than in Persona 5.