#186: The Infinite

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Infinity. Not about Infinity War, we’ll be talking about “going infinite”: a process in Magic: the Gathering and Hearthstone that involves getting enough rewards from each limited run that you are able to keep going without paying for more gems or other in-game currencies.

Allow me to explain. In a previous blog post, I discussed what “limited” runs are. Sealed, draft, and more. In Hearthstone, there’s a mode called “The Arena” which is very similar to drafting, except you don’t keep the cards you collect there and you draft from picks of 3 each time. In the arena, you can pay either 150 gold or $1.99 to enter, and every time you enter, the price stays the same. When you wrap up a run, after 3 losses or 12 wins, whichever happens first, you get rewards at the end, including gold and dust and packs. The gold you can use to then purchase another arena run, thus going infinite. If you’re the kind of person who’s talented enough to always have an arena run going, it’s because the gold you earn from your runs succeeds the gold spent to play arena.

In magic, while doing sealed runs, I went infinite for awhile. Probably about 5 runs in a row. Not very long, but my sealed runs would consistently reach around 6 to 7 wins, thus earning about 2,000 gems, the requirement to enter a sealed run. Again, it’s going infinite because you’re always earning enough currency to enter another time.

The reason I’m discussing “going infinite” here is because it’s a really cool process, and if you do well enough, you can really just continue playing as much as you like. You can always have a limited run going regardless, depending on how good you are and how good the cards were that you got. It’s up to chance, in some ways, but it’s also up to you. I like to think the impetus is on you more than anything else.

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#174: The Draft

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Today, I’ll be discussing drafting in Magic: the Gathering, a format that most of us are pretty unfamiliar with. Drafting is the process of looking at packs of cards, choosing cards from the pack to build a deck with, and using your deck against other players who have other decks.

The picture included at the top here is not emblematic of what drafting looks like, but it’s the only (appropriate) picture that appeared when I typed “draft” in the search box for pictures!

Let’s break this process down. There are two major types of drafts: limited and sealed. Limited involves three rounds of passing around packs, with one pack per round. People sit around a table, each person opens a pack, and then they choose one card to add to their “deck” and then pass the rest to their right. And so on and so forth. The process continues until there’s nothing left, and then you open another pack and continue doing it again. The cards you acquired during this process are enough to form a 40-card deck, which you then have to pit against other players. If you win games against them, you’re given sweet rewards to bring home with you. It’s a ton of fun to compete.

Sealed is a bit different. In sealed, you open six packs and everything is fair game for you. The cards are then yours. What you do with the contents of those packs is up to you. Sealed decks are usually a lot more competitive than limited decks, and the quality of cards is higher because you are given literally everything you need from the start. I generally prefer sealed to limited, because I like being able to have a stronger deck to compete with, but it’s also more expensive to start playing because of the six pack minimum.

#162: The Commander

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Not the commander of a ship, rather I am the commander of an elite, 100-card singleton deck of Magic: the Gathering cards. You guessed it, another blog post about Magic! It’s been on my mind so much lately, so I apologize for writing so much about it.

I recently ordered another commander deck, for the first time in a while. I haven’t played commander in ages, literally years and years ago. This past weekend, my friend Dan said that he held onto one of his old commander decks and that we can play together if I construct one. So naturally, I took that opportunity and decided to make one for myself. I bought a pre-constructed Lord Windgrace deck, which features landfall mechanics and a planeswalker as the commander. It’s kind of exciting to have a planeswalker commander, considering most commanders have to be legendary creatures, not planeswalkers. This one has a special rule allowing it to be used in the format.

So, here’s how the commander format works: you build a deck of 100 unique cards, with one of the cards being your commander. None of the cards are able to be copies; they have to be singleton. You can play the commander at any time and from any position. The format makes for unpredictable, awesome multi-player games because you know your cards won’t repeat themselves, and you have no idea what you’ll be drawing at any one time. There’s a concept called commander damage, which means if your commander deals a total of 21 damage to any one enemy player over the course of the game, then they are defeated. For reference, you start the game with 30 life, as opposed to the usual 20 life in standard games.

Commander is awesome, and probably my favorite casual format in magic. I highly recommend giving it a shot if you’ve never done it before.