#380: The Assessment


man wearing black and white stripe shirt looking at white printer papers on the wall

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Being assessed on things is never fun. I don’t like it when I have to give assessments to students, as I know the stress can be unbearable and difficult to manage. I don’t like how students are forced to feel like every assessment is a matter of life and death, that they need to take every test seriously or else their entire high school or college career is at stake. It feels like we over-test people, that when we try to collect comprehensive data on students, we end up having residual effects on all their psyches. How can I effectively manage students when they’re endlessly tested on one thing or another? How can I take care of them when the system in place doesn’t take care of them or account for their own wants and desires? That’s what bugs me about the whole system of assessments we have; there’s no rationale to it, and it runs completely counter to everything else we’re trying to do with them.

I guess that’s just the way it works these days. I was inspired to write about this topic because when I got back to work on Monday, I was greeted with a reminder of the assessment in front of them. It was on the computer screen, right there, as clear as day, no mistaking it. It’s impossible to ignore when it’s right in front of you like that. Assessments are endless these days, so they all kind of blend together in my mind, but this one stood out despite that fact. I think it’s because it’s the most recent one to me, but even then, they don’t usually stand out like that. They’re all the same, ultimately, only the names have changed. The kids know that clear as day, and so do I.

2 thoughts on “#380: The Assessment

  1. This is the first time I’m seeing an honest opinion on assessments from a teacher’s perspective, and I don’t know if I should be happy or sad that you feel the same. You know it’s not good, we know it’s not good, and yet we’re powerless to change the way things work.

    • They’re absolutely corrosive to student learning. It’s all influenced by big money interests outside of education, and it’s terrible that we’re forced to accept the status quo! I’m with you 100%.

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