Blog #15: The Amateur


gray wooden bridge

Photo by Ketan Kumawat on Pexels.com

I’m new to so many things. Being new, or a “noob,” can be overwhelming; so much information to take in and master, so many people to meet, and so much reading. But it is also an opportunity to learn, grow, and become something new, to add to your personality or identity. After learning how to write, design, and administer a D&D campaign, I became an amateur DM. Statuses can have a powerful effect over one’s self-perception. The life of an amateur involves going on quests to acquire titles to update your identity with.

Being an amateur is not necessarily a bad thing, and yet in so many ways, we look down upon people who seek learning in their studies. Think of all the times English language learners are joked at or made fun of in media or on the Internet because of their mistakes. Think of how popular grammatical and spelling errors are on “meme pages,” despite being such a common, average struggle. We look down upon the struggling and the average, and yet the average is, numerically speaking, where the majority of us are. A novice at something can be easily discouraged by outside factors, such as being mocked, when what they really need is encouragement, guidance, and validation.

I hate to see people laughed at, even if the intentions are harmless, when the person doing the laughing comes from a position of self-righteous privilege. We don’t usually consider how lucky we are, in the grand scheme of the world, to have been born in a first-world nation, let alone the country whose predominant language happens to be the lingua franca. Only learning one language in school (rather than learning four, if you were born Dutch) disadvantages us, but it also gives us the perception that our language is the most normal of all the rest.

Imagine how difficult it must be for people to learn English, in comparison to you learning Spanish or French or Italian in high school. There is tremendous value in learning languages (which is one reason why I’ve been doing more Duolingo recently; have to stay up on my Spanish studies!), as it puts you again in the amateur’s seat. You are back to being a student again, instead of speaking from a position of knowledge and authority. It can be refreshing to be an amateur every once in a while. Remind yourself what it is like to learn something new again.

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